Posts Tagged Data Center Physical Infrastructure

What’s Inside The Datapod System

Posted by on November 26, 2012  |  No Comments

The Datapod System utilizes Schneider Electric’s best in class power and cooling products

 

The Datapod System utilizes Schneider Electric’s Best in Class Power and Cooling Products. The APC Infrastructure Suite of power and cooling products are recognized as the World’s Leader for reliability and performance.

Power:  The intelligence of the Datapod System is that each component is scalable and modular. Beginning with the Award-Winning APC Symmetra Line of Uninterruptible Power Supply Unit (UPS). These units start at 40kW and can scale up to 2MW.

Cooling: Free-Air, Air/Water Economizers, In-Row, Hot-Aisle Containment, Cold-Aisle Containment options Cooling up to 33kW per rack possible. Datapod enables end users to save up to 40% savings in cooling costs.

Racks:  Up to 50U available. Network or Standard. The Datapod System can incorporate 20‘ or 40‘ Intermodal Compliant ISO Containers. The insulated, anti-static design provides the optimal IT environment.

Pod Management: The Datapod System is completely managed by a suite of software that allows the user to manage, control and trouble shoot potential problems remotely and via smart phone or tablet computer.  The IT assets, fire control systems, electrical and cooling systems are all monitored via standard IP networks.

Universal Networking Services is proud to be the North America Authorized Agent for Datapod™ .  Our partnership with Datapod™ allows us to deliver a unique alternative to the traditional bricks and mortar data center installation. We can provide the data center community an alternative solution that maximizes their investment and increases the reliability and availability of their mission-critical facility.  Datapod is an unique, modular data center system that incorporates innovative design and cutting edge mechanical and electrical engineering. Datapod has extended the concept of modular data center design to include critical site infrastructure such as modular generators, chillers, and deployment services thereby providing a complete infrastructure solution for data centers. By enabling data center users to deploy when they like, where they like and for how long they like, the Datapod system offers performance superior to that of  a “bricks and mortar” data center facility, deploys faster and at a more cost-effective price point.

Please feel free to email us at info@datapodnorthamerica.com or contact us to learn more.

Event Invitation: “Join The Conversation-Modular Data Center Solutions”

Posted by on November 8, 2012  |  No Comments

 Showcasing Datapod’s rapid remote deployment capability for a truly Modular and Expandable Data Centre solution.

Presentation Details

Title:  “Datapod-Who Will You Rely On?”

Speaker:  Adam Smith, Datapod Director of Operations

Location:  Denver DoubleTree, 3203 Quebec Street, Denver, CO 80204

Time:  Wednesday, November 14, 2012 at 1:00PM

Presentation Overview

Datapod, a leading energy efficient modular data center manufacturer announced today that its Director of Operations, Adam Smith, will be conducting  a presentation on modular data center design on November 14, 2012 in Denver, Colorado.

According to recent market research (451 Group), “The datacenter industry is at the beginning of a period of fundamental, disruptive change. A combination of technological, economic and market factors have been coming together, with the result that data centers are increasingly being engineered and constructed in a fundamentally different way than in the past. The emergence of prefabricated, modular data centers will have a major impact on the datacenter industry – its ecosystem, its economics and its technology.” During the presentation-“Datapod-Who Will You Rely On?”-Mr. Smith will introduce Datapod’s methodology of standardized, pre-engineerd and pre-built set of building blocks. Being widely adopted as the future of Data Centers, the Datapod System is a truly modular, scalable set of building blocks that has been designed over several years enabling users to realize the benefits of standardization, manufacturing efficiencies and reduced time to deployment. The system has proven to help clients align their infrastructure deployments to their technology requirements-in both size/capacity, time to deployment, duration of useful life and location/flexibility.

Who Should Attend

  • Data center owners and operators-challenged by the growth demands of their customers 
  • Multi-tenant and enterprise data center decision makers-charged with developing future technological data center strategies 
  • Architectural, engineering and design firms-specialized in data centers
  • Traditional data center equipment vendors (i.e. power and cooling infrastructure)- focused on the future data center market 
  • Financial professionals-evaluating investments in data center properties and companies
  • Financial professionals-evaluating investments in modular data center equipment vendors
  • Real estate and planning professionals-currently targeting the data center industry 
  • Hosting, cloud and managed services companies

About The Guest Speaker

Adam Smith, Director of Operations at Datapod, is an authority on the challenges faced by CEOs & CIOs in managing their data center infrastructure requirements and is at the forefront of the latest developments and innovation in modular data center solutions.  With extensive experience in the leadership of diverse global organizations, Adam’s success includes executive roles with APC-Australia/PAC and Datapod.


About the Sponsors

Universal Networking Services is proud to be the North America Authorized Agent for Datapod™ .  Our partnership with Datapod™ allows us to deliver a unique alternative to the traditional bricks and mortar data center installation. We can provide the data center community an alternative solution that maximizes their investment and increases the reliability and availability of their mission-critical facility.  Datapod is an unique, modular data center system that incorporates innovative design and cutting edge mechanical and electrical engineering. Datapod has extended the concept of modular data center design to include critical site infrastructure such as modular generators, chillers, and deployment services thereby providing a complete infrastructure solution for data centers. By enabling data center users to deploy when they like, where they like and for how long they like, the Datapod system offers performance superior to that of  a “bricks and mortar” data center facility, deploys faster and at a more cost-effective price point.

RSVP Requested

To learn more about this event or to RSVP please contact Waite Ave at info@datapodnorthamerica.com or 281-825-9790.


Datapod-Key Facts

Posted by on October 27, 2012  |  No Comments

Video showcases Datapod’s rapid remote deployment capability for a truly modular and expandable data center solution.

WHAT IS DATAPOD?

  • The Datapod System is a unique solution to the needs and problems facing data center facilities in every situation.
  • The Datapod System has extended the concept of modular data center design to the entire site infrastructure space.
  • The Datapod System meets the challenges of a sector in which growth is inevitable but the pace of growth is uncertain.
  • The Datapod System is scaleable, modular, upgradeable.
  • The Datapod System takes the idea of modular data centers to unrivaled levels of security, stability and flexibility.
  • The Datapod System can be configured as anything from a single data processing module operating with available services to a fully standalone data center facility.
  • The Datapod System can be installed in any location, indoors or out, and in any conditions subject only to area available for deployment.
  • The Datapod System delivers unrivaled set-up and operational cost savings and environmental advantages.
  • The Datapod System is assembled from factory-made, standardized modules with patent protection on a number of features.
  • The Datapod System is configured to exact client specifications at the point of manufacture, fully tested prior to shipping, and re-assembled at the client’s site.
  • The Datapod System incorporates Schneider Electric’s world’s best in class technology.
  • The Datapod System is typically configured, tested and commissioned within three months of order.

FIT FOR PURPOSE-THE ENGINEERING SOLUTION

  • FACTORY/SITE ACCEPTANCE TESTING: The Datapod System offers commissioning engineers the opportunity of full Factory Acceptance Testing where, in a “test drive” situation, final adjustments can be made to configuration prior to shipment to the client’s site.  Upon delivery, Site Acceptance Testing confirms compliance with specification prior to hand over.
  • CAPACITY: The Datapod System is the complete turnkey solution to the problem of over-specifiying or under-estimating data processing needs-the modular components can be scaled and configured to meet present or anticipated requirements and the system can be easily expanded when further capacity is required.
  • POWER SUPPLY: The Datapod System’s entry-level module (the Projectpod) can be connected to existing services or configured with a Utilitypod which provides a back-up power supply through a diesel generator.
  • COOLING: The Datapod System’s data hall modules have a preinstalled Hot Aisle Containment System by Schneider Electric offering the most effective and energy efficient means of maintaining optimum operational  conditions within the data hall.
  • INTEGRITY: The Datapod System has been engineered to function in any climate, in any situation.  Compliant to MIL-STD-188-124B with full protection against lighting strikes, static electricity build-up, dust intrusion and other threats; outer shell construction is from recycled steel, the inner shells are fabricated from stainless steel which is thermally and electricity insulated from the over shells.
  • VERSATILITY: The Datapod System comprises a number of modules enabling a wide variety of configurations from standalone Projectpod to integration into a full data processing capability with Starterpod, Expanderpod, Endpod, Utilitypod; the configuration can be expanded without interruption to functionality.
  • SAFETY: The Datapod System has safety designed into every aspect of the modules, from seamless flooring to eliminate trip hazards to fire detection and alarm systems.

CAPITAL EFFICIENCY-THE CFO’S SOLUTION:

  • SCALEABILITY: The Datapod System offers the great advantage of being flexible, it can be specified to meet present or immediately projected needs limiting expenditure to useful capacity and, if required, readily expanded without down time.
  • FLEXIBILITY: The Datapod System works wherever you need it; the standalone capability and its great durability recommend it for harsh and remote locations but it is equally at home installed within a corporate headquarters or, where an existing building is at full capacity, placed adjacent in the grounds, warehouse or in the car park.
  • CAPITAL COSTS: The Datapod System is the most capital efficient solution to data processing center requirements irrespective of size and operational environment; the speed of deployment from final specification, the ability to customize to meet exact operational requirements, the fully detailed contract price all contribute to the Datapod System’s cost advantage over alternative solutions.
  • BUILD COSTS: The Datapod System is based on the configuration of standardized modules which are easily and rapidly deployed reducing all aspects of build costs including time, labor and energy costs associated with traditional builds.
  • OPERATING COSTS: The Datapod System scales to precise data processing requirements, ensuring that operation costs reflect operational needs; the additional technology and design features of the System also contribute to cost effective operation through the cooling architecture, use of insulation and incorporation of Schneider Electrics’ class-leading technology.
  • CONSTRUCTION RISKS: The Datapod System is fully assembled and Factory Acceptance Tested prior to shipment to and deployment on the user’s site; while configuration reflects individual user needs the component modules are of standard design and construction meaning they are fully tested and they benefit form Datapod’s commitment to continuous improvement through experience and client feedback.
OPTIMUM EFFICIENCY-THE GREEN SOLUTION:
  • POWER CONSUMPTION: The Datapod System has been innovatively engineered for optimum energy efficiency by right sizing electrical and mechanical components the System posts figures that indicate electricity consumption levels fifty percent below those of equivalent data centers.
  • EMISSIONS: The Datapod System’s energy efficient construction means reduced emissions and, importantly in every case and in some locations critically, the deployment of the modular Datapod System means enormously reduced emissions impact at the construction stage over traditional build solutions.
  • COOLING SYSTEM: The Datapod System uses specialized chillers with several environmental benefits; the use of Schneider Electric’s class leading Hot Aisle Containment system can be combined with a water side economizer resulting in economies in power use, the System’s Utility pod in addition employs dry condenser units meaning that a standard Datapod System consumes Zero water.
  • RECYCLED/RECYCLABLE MATERIALS: The Datapod System uses recycled steel in its outer shell construction and other recycled or recyclable materials where ever possible throughout design and build.

BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER (FACTS AND FIGURES):

PROJECTPOD: Enable onsite computing and storage where and when you need it. Standalone fully self-contained, transportable for rapid deployment.  Includes fully self-contained air-cooled DX versions, provides data center capability anywhere at short lead time and for as long as required.  Low, medium, and high-density versions, utilizes condenser water or chilled water.

STARTERPOD: The starting point and first pod of your Datapod system, it contains the power, cooling and data input connections. Incorporates InRow Cooling and IT Enclosures, the expandable APC modular Symmetra UPS gives you the starting point for growth as required.  Built-In InRow cooling and NetShelter enclosures ensure your data center is up and running with no further upfront investment.  When 2 Starterpods are used, a 2(N+1) system is created providing the highest levels of availability and redundancy.

EXPANDERPOD: Grow your Datapod system by adding the pre-built Expanderpod.  It easily connects onto other ‘pods’ to expand your system.  Removable side-walls allow the creation of a limitless best-of-breed computer room, the system can be expanded as required by your IT needs, aligning your budgets with your requirements in real-time.  With pre-deployed power, inrow cooling and enclosures, you can build your data center on-demand.

ENDPOD: End your Datapod system with the Endpod.  The data center Hot Aisle can be accessed from either end.  The Endpod add more power, cooling and IT enclosures, and gives users the necessary space, access and the end door to the APC Hot-Aisle Containment System.  The Endpod is optional-some Datapod systems will continue to grow over time and not deploy the Endpod.  The solid, non-removable end wall ensures the highest levels of resistance to the elements.

CONNECTION NODE: The Connection Node makes the setup of the Datapod system a breeze.  This pre-deployable skid-mounted utility connection system for mains and generator power, cooling and data is designed to simplify the deployment, modification and removal of the Datapod System. Delivered to site in advance of the Starterpod, the Connection Node connects to the site mains power supply and optional diesel generator backup power supply. Data communication links and chilled water or condenser water from the site supply or Utilitypod are connected via the Connection Node.  Positioned 1 to 2 meters from the designated location, our APC engineers simply connect these 3 utilities from the Connection Node to the Datapod using pre-assembled link systems for rapid deployment.

ENTRYPOD: The Entrypod creates a secure and weatherproof system that doubles as office or storage space for data center staff.  The 10′ Entrypod cubicle, fitted with proximity card magnetic lock systems keeps the elements out of your data center.  It connects on both ends and enables multiple Datapods to be connected together via the Entrypod.

UTILITYPOD: The Utilitypod provides the backup power and cooling for your Datapod to operate anytime, anyplace.  Easily transportable, fully-rated diesel generator and fuel tans for backup power supply, and multiple redundant chillers to support the highest density Datapod system.  Housed within an identical 20′ enclosure and the capacity to support the highest density Datapod systems, the diesel generator provides 280kW of useable output power.  Cooling is supplied by 3X80kW chillers, giving redundancy to the critical cooling system.  The Utilitypod can be pre-deployed with the Connection Node or added later, as required. Alternatively the Utilitypod is available as a standalone system for use in non-Datapod projects.

Universal Networking Services is proud to be the North America Authorized Agent for Datapod™ . Our partnership with Datapod™ allows us to deliver a unique alternative to the traditional bricks and mortar data center installation. We can provide the data center community an alternative solution that maximizes their investment and increases the reliability and availability of their mission-critical facility.  Datapod is an unique, modular data center system that incorporates innovative design and cutting edge mechanical and electrical engineering. Datapod has extended the concept of modular data center design to include critical site infrastructure such as modular generators, chillers, and deployment services thereby providing a complete infrastructure solution for data centers. By enabling data center users to deploy when they like, where they like and for how long they like, the Datapod system offers performance superior to that of  a “bricks and mortar” data center facility, deploys faster and at a more cost-effective price point.

Please feel free to email us at info@datapodnorthamerica.com or contact us to learn more.

Guide for Reducing Data Center Physical Infrastructure Energy Consumption in Federal Data Centers

Posted by on June 20, 2012  |  No Comments

White Paper 250

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), along with the more recent Executive Order 13514, ask Federal government agencies to improve their environmental, energy and economic performance.  The typical data center consumes 50x the amount of energy of the average office space and is an obvious target for action  In fact, Federal Chief Information Officer Kundra cites an EPA report stating that Federal servers and data centers consumed 6 billion kWh of electricity in 2006.  If the current trend in energy consumption is allowed to continue, that consumption could exceed 12 billion kWh by 2012.  One of Kundra’s goals is to “promote the use of Green IT by reducing the overall energy and real estate foot print of government data centers.”  The federal government is looking for “game-changing approaches” to deal with the problematic growth in data centers rather than “brute force consolidation.”

So what do these high level mandates mean for Federal facility managers, IT managers and energy managers? Federal data center stakeholders will have to assess the energy situation within their own particular data centers and then formulate short-term and long-term plans for changes to their existing practices and existing infrastructure.  This paper will focus on energy efficiency gains that can be realized through optimization of physical infrastructure (i.e., power and cooling equipment).  Physical infrastructure accounts for more than half of the total energy consumption of a typical data center.  Approaches for improving IT equipment efficiency (i.e., servers, storage, telecommunications devices) are NOT within the scope of this paper.

“Guide for Reducing Data Center Physical Infrastructure Energy Consumption in Federal Data Centers” Full White Paper (Click Here To Download)

Executive Summary:

In an effort to create a clean energy economy, recent US presidents and congress have issued a series of legislation and executive orders requiring federal agencies to increase energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions in government facilities.  Vivek  Kundra, Federal Chief Information Officer, is supporting that effort by establishing a Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative to help reduce energy consumption in over 1,100 Federal data centers.  US Federal data center managers are on a timeline to respond with their final consolidation plan.  This paper analyzes the implication of these mandates and offers recommendations for how to improve energy efficiency in Federal data centers.  This paper is written for a US-only audience.

Contents:

  • The challenge of energy efficiency
  • How an efficiency assessment can help
  • Understanding the language of data center efficiency
  • Factors impacting data center efficiency measurement
  • Measuring & modeling
  • Integration of a mathematical model
  • Data center efficiency best practices

Conclusion:

Energy efficiency initiatives in Federal data centers can begin with assessments that can easily reveal the “low hanging fruit” when it becomes to energy conversation.  Techniques, such as blanking panels and hot aisle/cold aisle orientation for racks, can begin the process of improved energy efficiency.

However, the essence of improvement is accurate measurement of energy being consumed so that a baseline for improvement can be established.  Data center energy efficiency models can be utilized, at a reasonable cost, to measure consumption to a surprisingly accurate degree.

Once consumption is measured, management techniques and new technologies can then be deployed which significantly reduce energy costs throughout the electrical room, mechanical room and IT room of the data center.

White Paper Written By:

Ellen Kotzbauer, BEP, is a 19-year veteran of Schneider Electric and has held numerous engineering, manufacturing and marketing positions in the company. She is currently the Government segment manager and is responsible for defining and executing marketing strategy and campaigns for Schneider Electric government customers in the U.S. Ellen holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering from Northwestern University and is a certified Business Energy Professional.

Dennis Bouley, is a Senior Research Analyst at Schneider Electric’s Data Center Science Center.  He holds bachelor’s degrees in journalism and French from the University of Rhode Island and holds the Certificat Annuel from the Sorbonne in Paris, France.  He has published multiple articles in global journals focused on data center IT and physical infrastructure environments and has authored several white papers for The Green Grid.

Additional References:

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007)

Executive Order 13514


Accounting and Tax Benefits of Modular, Portable Data Center Infrastructure

Posted by on May 11, 2012  |  No Comments

White Paper 115

This white paper is provided to highlight the opportunities and benefits of involving a finance or tax professional who is knowledgeable in the acquisition and deployment of data center physical infrastructure (DCPI) assets. Applying the accounting options available within the framework of what is known as Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), DCPI assets may be better aligned with the goals and objectives of a particular business, institution, or organization. This document is not intended to provide or offer advice on tax planning, as only a qualified or certified financial professionals may actually provide tax advice.

Among the difficulties faced by owners of DCPI assets, is the absence of perceptive financial treatment of the individual portions of mission critical systems. Frequently, the UPS, power distribution unit (PDU), and branch circuit panels installed in the construction of a building (or as a major “improvement project“) will be booked as a “building improvement” and depreciated along with the concrete, steel, boilers and pipes of the building. The “building” will likely have a long depreciable life, which may be upwards of 30+ years. However, DCPI equipment typically has a relatively short useful life, even though the UPS, PDU, and related branch circuits may remain on the books long after they are declared obsolete. For many companies, improper booking of high technology DCPI such as UPS systems and PDUs routinely causes substantial problems in the form of overstated “real property” asset value, and the obligation to take a “write-down” in the year that the UPS and related parts are “retired”. A glossary is provided in the appendix of this paper to define various terms used throughout.

Recent improvements in the design and manufacture of DCPI equipment, particularly UPS systems, PDUs, and (to some extent) air conditioning, has opened up the opportunity to treat DCPI as “business equipment”, rather than a part of the building in which the equipment is installed. This achievement is the direct result of scalable, modular, and fully manufactured systems requiring little or no field wiring other than the connection of the input power (which may be accomplished through “cord and plug connected” means).

This improved DCPI works well in a dynamic business climate where technology changes frequently and economic cycles and leaseholds may be substantially shorter than real estate investment periods. The integration of this DCPI into a corporation, institution, or organization’s economic model is not difficult, because nearly all corporations, institution, or organizations have experience with the management of business equipment, including computers, copy machines, production machinery, and company owned vehicles.

“Accounting and Tax Benefits of Modular, Portable Data Center Infrastructure” Full White Paper (Click Here To Download)

Executive Summary:

Well-informed accounting treatment of data center physical infrastructure (DCPI) assets provides significant opportunities to contribute to improving the financial performance of a business, institution, or organization. Design and manufacturing improvements in modular, scalable UPS systems, power distribution units (PDUs), and computer room air conditioners have not only created technological benefits, but provide entirely new DCPI asset management opportunities with direct and measurable financial benefits.

Contents:

  • “Traditional” vs. factory-built solutions
  • Understanding property taxes and related government fees
  • Financial planning for DCPI assets
  • Implementation of an asset management strategy for DCPI (Steps 1-7)
    • Step 7:  Cost segregation

Cost segregation:

By applying different depreciation rates to different components of a building, a business, institution, or organization may lower its corporate income taxes and thereby make available more cash flow. Cost segregation, as practiced by financial professionals with experience in corporate income tax accounting, is largely an exercise in recognizing and separately accounting for the costs of 5, 7, 10, 15, and 20 year property from the 30 or 39 year property classifications. The property in the each of the classifications from 5 to 20 years, in addition to being properly separated from the 30 or 39 year categories, once properly identified, are eligible for accelerated depreciation. Accelerated depreciation allows a business, institution, or organization paying corporate income tax to further increase deductions during the early life of the equipment.

Businesses, institutions, and organizations that own high technology assets can benefit the most from employing cost segregation methodology, so long as each asset can pass the so called function and use test and the inherent permanency test. The function and use test is intended to determine whether an asset serves any purpose in the operation of the building, as carefully differentiated from the business conducted within the building. If the asset is determined not to serve any purpose in the operation of the building, it is then subject to the inherent permanency test, where ease of removal and the complexity of the removal process are evaluated. Modular, scaleable, factory built DCPI performing the work or mission of a business, institution, or organization, routinely pass both tests easily.

Conclusion:

The impact of tax and tax related asset management strategies on the total cost of ownership of DCPI can be significant. These savings are entirely separate to gains in energy efficiency and the cost of maintenance, compared to an old, oversized legacy or traditional UPS system, with high electrical energy consumption, escalating repair, deferred maintenance, and real estate costs. Personal property, real estate, and corporate income tax savings, and tax related savings (such as the tax component of rent) can produce direct financial benefits, in excess of 20% of the installed cost of a properly sized, installed, and “booked”, factory-built UPS and PDU solution.

The key to successful implementation of a tax and tax related asset management strategy is involving a financial professional along with the IT professionals, and facility managers involved in the deployment of DCPI, and:

  • Consider treating all factory-built DCPI solutions as business equipment
  • Consider declaring factory built DCPI as personal rather than real property
  • Create realistic depreciation schedules
  • Avoid life cycle errors creating stranded asset requiring a “write-down” against earnings
  • Reassess permit and inspection requirements for factory built DCPI
  • Plan for asset portability and asset reassignment; and incorporate tax related savings including
  • Plan for reduction in construction costs for a dedicated UPS room
  • Lower monthly or annual rents or allocation cost associated with dedicated UPS rooms, hallways, and common areas required to access the dedicated UPS rooms

Modular, scalable UPS systems, PDUs, and computer room air conditioners have not only created technological benefits, but provide entirely new DCPI tax and asset management opportunities with direct and measurable financial benefits. While this white paper is intended to highlight these opportunities, its primary message is the benefit of involving a tax professional in any team planning improvement to a data center or network room DCPI. The results will be dramatic.

White Paper Written By:

Barry Rimler

Organizations that own high technology assets can benefit the most from exercising cost segregation strategies, so long as each asset can pass the function and use test and the inherent permanency test.  Modular, scaleable factory built Data Center Physical Infrastructure (DCPI) performing the mission of a business routinely pass both tests with ease.

Tax and tax related asset management strategies create a significant impact on the total cost of ownership of DCPI.  These savings are entirely separate to gains in energy efficiency.  Successful implementation of cost segregation strategies involves a financial professional along with the IT professionals and facility managers in the deployment of DCPI.

Universal Networking Services works closely with a dedicated cost segregation team that includes engineers and tax experts that have performed thousands of tax projects resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in benefits.   The initial assessment to determine qualification is free.  If you think you may qualify for cost segregation and want to increase your cash flow please feel free to contact us to learn more.

Make Your Data Center More Efficient-TradeOff™ Tools

Posted by on April 25, 2012  |  No Comments

APC TradeOff ToolsTM, are web-based applications with easy-to-use interfaces designed for use in the early stages of data center concept and design development. By enabling data center professionals to experiment with various scenarios regarding virtualization, efficiency, power sizing, capital costs, and other key design issues, APC TradeOff Tools break down major data center planning decisions into a series of smaller, more manageable decisions. Use of these tools helps validate, through modeling, the overall design of a data center.

What are TradeOff Tools?

TradeOff Tools are simple, interactive tools, based on data and science, that make it easy to vary parameters, experiment with “what if” scenarios and make tradeoffs during data center planning.

  • Simple, automated tools to support specific planning decisions
  • Models complex interactions of systems based on data and science
  • One-screen, standardized user interface
  • Instant output allows for rapid creation of “what if” scenarios

When should they be used?

Used early in the planning process, TradeOff Tools help avoid planning roadblocks by making informed and accurate decisions

How do they help in planning a data center?

TradeOff Tools help show quantifiable, tangible benefits of implementing certain technologies and justify project decisions.

Video Tutorial Presentation of APC TradeOff Tools™

Data Center Efficiency Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of alternative power and cooling approaches on energy costs.

The purpose of this tool is to show how various design decisions and operating conditions affect the efficiency and electrical costs of a typical generic data center.  As the user inputs details regarding the power and cooling configuration results are calculated based upon a tested and validated three parameter model.

Profiles a data center and calculates the resulting efficiency and electrical cost based on data center characteristics. Users can then understand the impact each key data center decision has on the data center’s efficiency.

Cooling Economizer Mode PUE Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of geography and cooling characteristics on PUE, energy cost, and carbon emissions.

The purpose of this tool is to compare seven common cooling architectures and demonstrate their expected annual PUE, energy cost, and carbon emissions.  As the user inputs details such as the data center location and power & cooling configuration inputs such as IT inlet temperature, % load, and type of power & lighting, results are calculated.

UPS Efficiency Comparison Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of UPS efficiencies on energy costs and carbon footprint.

The purpose of this tool is to compare the efficiencies of two UPS systems and to show the impact these efficiencies have on electricity cost and carbon footprint.  UPSs may be selected from a pull down list, or users can define their own UPS (Schneider Electric or other vendor).  Pre-populated data was obtained by curve fitting to measured efficiency data .  All measurements were taken in normal operating mode, at typical environmental conditions, with nominal elctrical input and balanced resistive load (PF=1.0) output.

Data Center Carbon Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of changes in data center efficiency on energy costs and carbon footprint.

The purpose of this tool is to recognize how “green” a data center is by converting energy usage rates into carbon emissions. The tool illustrates how hypothetical changes to a data center’s location, efficiency, and power load can impact carbon dioxide emissions and the electric bill.

Illustrates how changes to a data center’s location, efficiency, and power load can impact carbon dioxide emissions and the electric bill. This provides management with a general indication of how “green” their data center is today and how “green” it could be.

Data Center Design Planning Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of physical infrastructure technology and growth plan strategies on key design parameters.

This tool allows key decision makers to analyze these parameters, evaluate tradeoffs, and make decisions, to avoid costly mistakes that can magnify and propagate through later deployment phases.

IT Carbon & Energy Allocation Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of efficiency, load characteristics, and location on energy and carbon allocation for IT users.

The purpose of the tool is to help data center operators assign carbon and energy costs to IT users. Energy (cost) and carbon allocations are computed on a per-server basis, based on an “average” server.  The units of “average” server can then be apportioned to the IT users using a method od choice depending on the business model.  This tool allows IT users to make smarter decisions regarding their total cost, as they consider options such as virtualization and server retirement.

Virtualization Energy Cost Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of server virtualization and data center design choices on energy and space savings.

This tool illustrates potential IT, physical infrastructure, and energy savings resulting from the virtualization of servers. It allows the user to input data regarding data center capacity, load, number of servers, energy cost, and other data center elements.

Comprehends IT and physical infrastructure characteristics and calculates energy savings resulting from the virtualization of servers. This allows the user to test the impact of virtualization and various physical infrastructure improvements on their data center floor space and on their energy consumption.

Data Center Capital Cost Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of physical infrastructure design changes on capital costs.

This tool identifies calculates capital costs based on parameters including load, redundancy, density, and power/cooling characteristics, the tool can project the number of racks required and the floor space required.

Identifies key data center physical infrastructure parameters and calculates capital costs based on those parameters. This allows data center users to judge how changes to data center location, IT load, and cooling and power infrastructure can impact overall capital costs

Data Center Power Sizing Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of server and storage configurations on IT load capacity and required utility input power.

This tool defines basic characteristics of the IT load and calculates how much utility input power would be required to support that load, allowing users to experiment with “what if” scenarios by modifying the load characteristics of servers, mainframes, and storage. Total load is then calculated and the tool generates a corresponding utility power requirement.

Defines basic characteristics of the IT load and calculates how much utility input power would be required to support such a load. This provides users with a general idea of how much power in kilowatts they will need to run their data center.

Data Center AC vs. DC Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact on data center efficiency of various AC and DC power distribution architectures.

Users can compare the energy efficiency of four different power distribution architectures, including Legacy AC (typically 208 V with older data center UPS, PDU, and IT power supplies), Best Practice AC (208 V with latest generation UPS, PDU, and IT power supplies), 415 V AC (same modern components as Best Practice AC, but eliminates the PDUs and assumes 230 V AC power supplies), and 380 V DC (uses a theoretical DC UPS, no PDUs, and IT power supplies with 1.5% efficiency benefit).

Compares four different AC and DC power distribution architectures and calculates their respective efficiencies. This allows the user to make an educated decision on the optimal architecture for their data cente

Data Center InRow™ Containment Selector (Click Here To Download):

Impact of preferences and constraints on the recommended containment approach.

This tool generates a prototype rack and row cooling configuration based on the user’s layout preferences and the physical constraints of the room.

Generates a prototype rack and row cooling configuration based on the user’s preferences and the physical constraints of the room. This provides the user with their optimal InRow cooling containment configuration.

InRow Ancillary IT Equipment Cooling Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of IT, cooling, & room characteristics on ability for row-based cooling to support ancillary IT loads.

This calculator helps the data center designer determine if additional cooling must be provided or if the existing row-based cooling is sufficient as miscellaneous ancillary IT equipment is added outside of the rows, such as tape silos, storage equipment, and networking gear.

Find out how Universal Networking Services brings a comprehensive solution from the utility pole to the server and assists with navigating the complex waters of most size and scope of projects. Whether you are upgrading, retrofitting or developing a new design-build, UNS and its partners generate efficient, scalable, reliable and manageable critical infrastructure solutions to your organization. Our holistic, common sense approach lowers our clients Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and maximizes efficiencies offered by the advancements in critical power and cooling infrastructure.

Please feel free to contact us to learn more.

Universal Networking Services Institute for Data Center Professionals

Posted by on April 6, 2012  |  No Comments

Data center education that will lay the critical foundation to run an efficient data center.

Data center efficiency should be a topic of significant importance to all data center operators. At Universal Networking Services (UNS), our philosophy is simple: knowledge is key to data center efficiency!  UNS Institute for Data Center Professionals offers the data center community priceless educational opportunities through numerous gateways:

Educational Gateways:

“Educational Series For Data Center Professionals”

“Breakfast and Learn Series For Data Center Professionals”

Universal Networking Services Blog

Data Center Critical Power and Cooling LinkedIn Group

Universal Networking Services Twitter

About UNS “Educational Series For Data Center Professionals”:

The “Educational Series For Data Center Professionals” is a customized training series conducted at YOUR facility that provides the education that will lay the critical foundation for your organization to run an efficient data center.  UNS works diligently with you and your staff to customize a curriculum specific to your facilities requirements that educate and showcase the latest in technologies and best practices for data center power, cooling, monitoring, security and management.  Choose either topics from current course curriculum (see course curriculum below) or customize your training.   At UNS, we believe education is key to controlling your data center costs.  With that in mind, we couple your customized training session with our signature Critical Facility Energy Profile (CFEP) assessment.  To highlight, our CFEP service provides an on-site, non-invasive, risk free analysis of your current Network Critical Physical Infrastructure (NCPI) to determine the baseline efficiency of your data center.   On the first day, we will perform a site/data center assessment (CFEP), during which, items that are affecting efficiency and reliability are compiled.  On the second day, we return to the facility to perform a customized education/training session on today’s best strategies for power, cooling, monitoring security and management using examples from YOUR facility.  The education provided will drive your organization’s total-cost-of-ownership (TCO) as low as possible.   UNS is committed to understanding our clients challenges and provide the tools needed to operate their businesses with reliability and maximum efficiency. Contact us today to learn more about this unique educational opportunity.

Current “Educational Series For Data Center Professionals” Course Curriculum:

“POWER FUNDAMENTALS”-If you’ve ever asked yourself…”What’s the difference between kVA and kW?  AC and DC, isn’t that a band? Single-phase or three-phase?…then this is the course for you! In this course, students learn the fundamentals of AC and DC power, from generation to application.

“POWER DISTRIBUTION”-“With great power comes great responsibility.”  One can have all the power in the world but efficiently distributing that power to your critical equipment is the trick that makes the difference between business as usual or lights out!  In this course, students learn the fundamentals and application of efficient power delivered in terms of both off-site and on-site power generation.

“EFFICIENT POWER MANAGEMENT-OPTIMIZING TCO”- “Generator? Check. UPS? Check. Doors secured? Check. Red lights? Check…uh-oh! What do we do now? Who will we call?  Is this covered under a service agreement?” Managing your assets is one thing but doing so in a manner that lowers your TCO and allows you to sleep better at night takes some strategy.  Increasing availability and reliability while continuously decreasing costs means you’ll have to know when to break from the crowd and try less conventional methods.  This course is designed for the professional that has a solid understanding of both “Power Fundamentals” and “Power Distribution” and is ready to develop a strategy to manage their time, manpower and assets with maximum efficiency.

“CRITICAL COOLING 101-FUNDAMENTALS OF AIR CONDITIONING”-This course explains the fundamentals of air conditioning systems and how they can be leveraged in a data center to your advantage.  Topics include:  The Properties of Heat Transfer, The Ideal Gas Law, The Refrigeration Cycle, Condensation Control, and Comfort vs. Precision Cooling.  With a solid understanding of air conditioning principles, this course enables students to make knowledgeable decision on what air conditioning solutions are right for their data center-solutions based on fact, rather than sales and marketing strategy.

“EFFICIENT COOLING-OPTIMIZING COOLING STRATEGIES AND ARCHITECTURE”-Today’s servers generate significantly more heat, and in more concentrated, confined space than they did 20 years ago. So, why are data centers still using the same cooling strategies of yesteryear? This course takes a hard look at data center cooling architectures from many angles: efficiency, reliability, TCO, feasibility and availability, enabling students to make the best choices in cooling their critical equipment.  “Understanding the difference between comfort cooling and critical cooling; understanding the different types of cooling architectures and their deployment; and developing a method of choosing one cooling strategy over another” are all topics discussed in this course offering.

About UNS “Breakfast and Learn Series for Data Center Professionals”:

The “Breakfast and Learn Educational Series for Data Center Professionals” offers the data center community multiple opportunities to learn from their peers, share experiences, and expand industry knowledge.  Our educational sessions are conducted throughout the United States quarterly and will be advertised via our Data Center Critical Power and Cooling LinkedIn Group and/or follow us on Twitter.  Our “Breakfast and Learn Series” can also be customized and conducted at your own facility.  For more information on our “Breakfast and Learn Series” please contact us.

Current “Breakfast and Learn” Discussions:

“RIGHT-SIZING VERSUS OVER-SIZING: EFFICIENCY IN THE DATA CENTER”- Forecasting and measuring the total cost of ownership (TCO) for Data Center Physical Infrastructure (DCPI) is essential for return-on-investment (ROI) analysis.  Oversizing is the main contributor to excess TCO.  Oversizing creates inefficiencies in the data center including excess capital cost, operating cost, and specifically energy cost.  The average data center operator can achieve the highest return investment in relation to DCPI through right-sizing.  Right-sizing the DCPI system to the load is the key to optimizing TCO and has the most impact on DCPI electrical consumption.  Right-sizing can potentially eliminate up to 50% of the electrical bill in real-world scenarios.  For example, potential electricity cost savings for a typical 1 MW data center has been shown to be $2,000,000 to $4,000,000 over a typical 10-year life to the facility.  Data center efficiency is key to controlling your energy costs and should be a topic of significant importance to all data center operators.  This discussion is available through our “Breakfast and Learn Educational Series For Data Center Professionals”.

“IS PERIMETER COOLING DEAD?”-Traditional data center “room” cooling is unable to accommodate the latest generation of high and variable density IT equipment resulting in cooling systems that are inefficient, unpredictable, and low in power density.  To address these problems, row-oriented and rack-oriented cooling architectures have been developed.  Our presentation, “Is Perimeter Cooling Dead” examines and contrasts the 3 basic cooling approaches:  room, row, and rack architectures.  Each approach has an appropriate application but row-orientated cooling is emerging as the solution of choice for most next generation data centers.  Next generation data centers demand the flexibility, predicability, scalability, reduced electrical power consumption, reduced TCO and optimum availability that row and rack-oriented cooling architectures can provide.  Additionally, the factors that gave rise to the establishment and use of the raised floor is no longer justified or desirable.  To learn more about this topic, “Is Perimeter Cooling Dead” is available for your organization through our unique “Breakfast and Learn” Educational Series For Data Center Professionals.

About Universal Networking Services Blog “Don’s Corner”:

Data center industry blog that discusses the most relevant topics challenging the data center industry today.  Don Melchert, Critical Facility Specialist, shares in “Don’s Corner” his extensive knowledge and experience from the mission critical arena.  “Don’s Corner” highlights real world experiences to provide you the tools to maximize your efficiency while lowering your operating costs.

About Universal Networking Services LinkedIn “Data Center Critical Power and Cooling Group”:

Join UNS and industry peers on an open forum to discuss the following topics relating to data center “best practices”.  Key areas are:

– Power

– Cooling

– Racks- Security

– Management

– Fire Suppression

– Personnel

Submit your questions or comments on issues that affect your data center and have them answered by our Critical Facility Specialist.  We provide valuable insight to common problems that often plague modern data centers. Join the discussion at Data Center Critical Power and Cooling LinkedIn Group.

About Universal Networking Services Twitter:

Follow us on Twitter as we tweet/share industry related news, event postings, and company updates.

APC Data Center University

Data Center University™ (DCU) offers industry-leading education for IT professionals‚ facilities managers‚ engineers‚ designers‚ consultants‚ and anyone involved in the critical decisions and infrastructure planning of data centers worldwide. The changing nature of data centers‚ and the technology that impacts them‚ makes it even more critical that employees remain up to date on the current theories and best practices for issues around topics of power‚ cooling‚ management‚ security‚ and planning.

DCU provides a full curriculum of courses that educate and deliver up-to-the-minute information when and where you need it. Our online program is intended to be manageable and attainable‚ and with our Certification exam‚ you can quantify your learning and experience as a true data center professional!

Energy University by Schneider Electric

Schneider Electric, the global specialist in Energy Management has launched an e-learning website Energy University to provide the latest information and professional training on Energy Efficiency concepts and best practice! All in ONE Place – All in ONE site!

In addition to learning new energy saving ideas that directly contribute to the overall well-being of the earth; you will also become an even more valuable employee by contributing to the bottom line for your company. Learn something new today and apply the knowledge tomorrow. Become an Energy Efficiency Champion! Read more…

Top 10 Mistakes in Data Center Operations: Operating Efficient and Effective Data Centers

Posted by on March 29, 2012  |  No Comments

White Paper 2

For years, the data center industry has accepted that human operational error, not poor data center design or engineering, is the number one cause of data center downtime1. Uptime Institute recognizes this with its Tier Standards on Operational Sustainability. As the industry begins to adopt these ratings, regulators, insurers and end users are all going to be increas- ing their scrutiny of data center operations.

Now is the time for companies to evaluate their data center operations programs. They must be able to clearly articulate operational requirements and design an operations program based on the risk profile of the data center. However, the road to creating an industry-best operations program will not be easy, especially for those companies whose core expertise is not in business critical facilities.

While numerous consultants in the field can help you find your way, very few have data center or mission critical expertise—a vital component if you are looking to achieve operational sustainability. White Paper 145, The Top 9 Mistakes in Data Center Planning, discusses the nine top mistakes businesses make when building or expanding their data centers. Now we’re going to reveal the ten biggest mistakes you can make in the next logical step: data center operations.

“Top 10 Mistakes in Data Center Operations: Operating Efficient and Effective Data Centers” Full White Paper 2 (Click Here)

Executive Summary:

How can you avoid making major mistakes when operating and maintaining your data center(s)? The key lies in the methodology behind your operations and maintenance program. All too often, companies put immense amounts of capital and expertise into the design of their facilities. However, when construction is complete, data center operations are an afterthought. This whitepaper explores the top ten mistakes in data center operations.

Contents:

  • Introduction
  • The Big Mistakes:
  1. Not including your operations team in facility design
  2. Relying too much on data center design
  3. Failure to correctly address the staffing requirement
  4. Failure to train and develop your talent
  5. Failing to consistently drill and test skills
  6. Failure to overlay your operations program with documented processes and procedures
  7. Failure to implement appropriate processes and procedures
  8. Failure to develop and implement Quality Systems
  9. Failure to use software management tools
  10. Thinking you can build a best in breed program as quickly as a data center

    Conclusion:

    Now more than ever, companies must realize the importance of a sustainable operations program. To achieve operational sustainability, organizations must act quickly to assess their current programs and begin building an operational methodology that avoids common mistakes. A complete program integrates people, processes, and systems in a manner that promotes quality assurance and continuous improvement.

    Companies ill equipped to quickly design a program of this magnitude should seek the assistance of mission-critical subject matter experts. The alternative invites unnecessary delay, risk, and expense. By implementing a best in breed program, you will protect your capital investment and ensure stronger returns years after year.

    White Paper 2 Written By:

    Bob Woolley is the Senior Vice President of Critical Environment Services at Lee Technologies, a Schneider Electric company.

    Mr. Woolley has been involved in the critical facilities management field for over 25 years. Bob served as Vice President of Data Center Operations for Navisite, as well as Vice President of Engineering for COLO.COM.  He was also a Regional Manager for the Securities Industry Automation Corporation (SIAC) telecommunications division and operated his own critical facilities consulting practice.  Mr. Woolley has extensive experience in building technical service programs and developing operations programs for mission critical operations in both the telecommunications and data center environments.

    Universal Networking Services brings a comprehensive solution from the utility pole to the server and assists with navigating the complex waters of most size and scope of projects. Whether you are upgrading, retrofitting or developing a new design-build, UNS and its partners generate efficient, scalable, reliable and manageable critical infrastructure solutions to your organization. Our holistic, common sense approach lowers our clients Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and maximizes efficiencies offered by the advancements in critical power and cooling infrastructure.

    Please feel free to contact us to learn more.


    Don’s Corner: “Right-Sizing Versus Over-Sizing: Efficiency In The Data Center”

    Posted by on February 29, 2012  |  No Comments

    Don Melchert, Critical Facility Specialist

    “RIGHT-SIZING VERSUS OVER-SIZING: EFFICIENCY IN THE DATA CENTER”

    Forecasting and measuring the total cost of ownership (TCO) for Data Center Physical Infrastructure (DCPI) is essential for return-on-investment (ROI) analysis. Oversizing is the main contributor to excess TCO. Oversizing creates inefficiencies in the data center including excess capital cost, operating cost, and specifically energy cost. The average data center operator can achieve the highest return investment in relation to DCPI through rightsizing.  Right-sizing the DCPI system to the load is the key to optimizing TCO and has the most impact on DCPI electrical consumption.  Right-sizing can potentially eliminate up to 50% of the electrical bill in real-world scenarios.  For example, potential electricity cost savings for a typical 1 MW data center  has been shown to be $2,000,000 to $4,000,000 over a typical 10-year life of the facility.  Data center efficiency is key to controlling your energy costs  and should be a topic of significant importance to all data center operators.

    The single largest avoidable cost associated with typical data center and network room infrastructure is oversizing.  To learn more about how you can prevent this unnecessary cost, “Right-Sizing Versus Over-Sizing: Efficiency In The Data Center” is available for your organization via our unique “Breakfast and Learn” Educational Series For Data Center Professionals.  This series provides the education that will lay the critical foundation for your organization to run an efficient data center. Please feel free to contact me for further information at d.melchert@apcdistributors.com or 918-760-8236. Additional resources pertaining to this topic are presented below for your reference.

    Avoiding Costs from Oversizing Data Center and Network Room Infrastructure (White Paper #37) Overview:

    Executive Summary:

    The physical and power infrastructure of data centers and network rooms is typically oversized by more than 100%. Statistics related to oversizing are presented. The costs associated with oversizing are quantified. The fundamental reasons why oversizing occurs are discussed. An architecture and method for avoiding oversizing is described.

    Highlights:

    • TCO cost drivers and opportunities to control TCO.
    • Information and statistics related to over-sizing.
    • Practical advantages of right-sizing.
    • Energy consumption reduction in DCPI equipment.
    • Examine key reasons why the industry is moving toward modular, scalable DCPI solutions.

    Conclusion:

    Data centers and network rooms are routinely oversized to three times their required capacity. Oversizing drives excessive capital and maintenance expenses, which are a substantial fraction of the overall lifecycle cost. Most of this excess cost can be recovered by implementing a method and architecture that can adapt to changing requirements in a cost- effective manner while at the same time providing high availability.

    References:

    Implementing Energy Efficient Data Centers (White Paper #114) Overview:

    Executive Summary:

    Electricity usage costs have become an increasing fraction of the total cost of ownership (TCO) for data centers. It is possible to dramatically reduce the electrical consumption of typical data centers through appropriate design of the data center physical infra- structure and through the design of the IT architecture. This paper explains how to quantify the electricity savings and provides examples of methods that can greatly reduce electrical power consumption.

    Conclusion:

    The cost of electricity for data centers is a substantial operating cost that can and should be managed. A data center designed for reduced power consumption also saves other costs such as capital and operating costs associated with power and cooling systems, as well as saving space.

    Electrical consumption of existing data centers can be reduced through various low cost methods but primarily via migration to more energy efficient computing platforms. For new data centers, there are additional options both in the IT architecture and in the DCPI architec- ture that can gain much greater savings.

    The electrical power consumption is typically shared evenly between the IT loads and DCPI devices. Any rational approach to reduction in electrical usage must treat the combined IT / DCPI design as a system in order to maximize the benefit.

    Some equipment providers offer complete standardized data center designs specifically engineered for efficiency, and energy efficiency audit services are available for users desiring to reduce power consumption in existing data centers.

    The cost savings opportunities have been shown to be very large yet the investment required to achieve them is small or even zero in some cases, when compared with legacy approaches to data center design.

    References:

    Determining Total Cost of Ownership for Data Center and Network Room Infrastructure (White Paper #6) Overview:

    Executive Summary:

    An improved method for measuring total cost of ownership (TCO) of data center and network room physical infrastructure and relating these costs to the overall Information Technology infrastructure is described, with examples. The cost drivers of TCO are quantified. The largest cost driver is shown to be unnecessary unabsorbed costs resulting from the oversizing of the infrastructure.

    Conclusion:

    Expressing TCO for data center and network room physical infrastructure on a per-rack basis normalizes the measurement of TCO, providing a metric that can be used to compare data centers/ network rooms and to compare different approaches to design.

    The use of a TCO calculation tool and method was described. This tool permits the evaluation of cost control strategies, and can estimate TCO for specific installations.

    The per rack lifetime TCO of a high availability data center is approximately $120K. The oversizing of infrastructure is a major contributor to this cost, and on average 30% cost savings can be obtained by implementing practical design techniques using modular scalable data center infrastructure.

    References:

    Universal Networking Services Extends Scheduling Deadline For Free Critical Facility Energy Profiles to March 31, 2012.

    Posted by on February 21, 2012  |  No Comments

    Universal Networking Services Extends Scheduling Deadline For Free Critical Facility Energy Profiles To March 31, 2012.

    “Critical Facility Energy Profiles (CFEP) service provides a detailed analysis of the data center power and cooling infrastructure to optimize operating efficiency and significantly control energy costs.”

    St. Petersburg, Florida February 22, 2012: Exceptional interest by the data center community for free Critical Facility Energy Profile (CFEP) assessments has prompted Universal Networking Services (UNS), a leading provider of mission- critical power and cooling infrastructure products and services to extend the scheduling date for to March 31, 2012.

    Waite Ave, Vice President of Operations, states “Nearly half of a data center’s energy bill is from power and cooling. We are excited to offer this opportunity to the data center community to save on energy costs. Today’s IT departments face complex challenges that demand attention to their bottom line. Up to 75 percent of the energy used feeds power-hungry servers and the operation of mechanical and electrical systems that keep the lights on and, above all, keep the IT equipment cool. Smaller, more powerful IT equipment is considerably hotter than older systems, making heat management a major challenge. UNS and its partners take a broad view of these challenges in today’s IT facilities. Often, our recommendations, without any capital investment by the client, can generate savings on utility costs. If the client choses to implement modern technology such as in-row/in-rack cooling infrastructure the savings are often compounded. As an example, we have seen upwards of 40% savings in our clients utility bill by implementing this sort of IT architecture. Normally pricing is associated with our Critical Facility Energy Profiles but we want to encourage local companies to be proactive in minimizing their costs and maximizing their efficiency by offering this service free for a limited time.  At UNS, we believe education is key to controlling your data center costs.  With that in mind, the CFEP assessment can also be coupled with our Data Center Institute Educational Series.  Our customized training series provides the education that will lay the critical foundation to run an efficient data center.  Based on CFEP findings, UNS can customize a curriculum  specific to your facilities requirements that educate and showcase the latest in technologies and best practices for data center power, cooling, monitoring, security and management.”

    About Universal Networking Services, LLC

    Universal Networking Services (UNS) specializes in mission-critical power and cooling solutions for wiring closets, server rooms, and data centers. UNS provides product acquisition, design, engineering, education/training, and installation management and maintenance services for critical facilities.

    About Critical Facility Energy Profiles (CFEP)

    Our Critical Facility Energy Profile (CFEP) service provides a non-invasive, risk free analysis of your current Network Critical Physical Infrastructure (NCPI) to determine the baseline efficiency of your wiring closet, server room, or data center. This assessment of NCPI equipment includes:

    • Power
    • Cooling
    • Enclosures/Racks
    • Security
    • Fire Suppression
    • Management
    • Recycle/Re-Use of Old Equipment

    The CFEP assessment provides analysis of the data center power and cooling systems to determine the operating efficiency of the data center. Our specialists document the existing infrastructure, determine the efficiency and provide an assessment of the factors limiting the achievable efficiency of the data center and make both non-capital and capital cost recommendations for changes to maximize efficiency. This includes:

    • Assessment of the electrical efficiency within the data center.
    • The breakdown of power, cooling and lighting losses.
    • Assessment of cooling system losses of CRAC/CRAH units, humidification and heat rejection losses.
    • Assessment of the power system losses including UPS and power distribution.
    • Recommendations to improve data center efficiency.
    • Outline/itemize anticipated efficiency gains for each recommended improvement

    After the completion of our assessment, a detailed report is generated that outlines the problem areas, why it’s a problem and recommendations on how to correct the situation. Armed with solutions and recommendations from the CFEP, companies are saving thousands each month with no-cost solutions and a minimum 30% reduction in their utility bills, with an average “real world” efficiency gain closer to 70%.  With UNS, service is everything. We are committed to understanding our clients challenges and provide the tools needed to operate their business with reliability and maximum efficiency.

    CFEP assessments can also be incorporated with our Data Center Institute Educational Series. Based on CFEP findings found on day one, UNS can customize a curriculum  specific to your facilities requirements that educate and showcase the latest in technologies and best practices for data center power, cooling, monitoring, security and management. The way it works is, on the first day, UNS will perform a site/data center assessment (CFEP), during which, items that are effecting efficiency and reliability are compiled.  On the second day, we return to the facility to perform a education/training session on today’s best strategies for Power, Cooling and Management using examples from YOUR facility.”

    To learn more details of the CFEP, or to schedule this unique offer please contact Waite Ave at w.ave@apcdistributors.com or 1-888-486-7725, ext. 201.

    To learn more about Universal Networking Services visit www.criticalpowerandcooling.com.


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