Posts Tagged network critical physical infrastructure

APC White Paper Podcasts Directory

Posted by on February 7, 2012  |  No Comments

Waite Ave, Vice President of Operations

We hope you enjoy this directory of APC’s White Paper Podcasts.  Listen when you want, where you want. Learn what you need to know! APC’s Podcasts provide you a convenient way to stay informed on current trends in the data center.

These recorded excerpts of APC’s most popular white papers provide the techniques, guidelines and tools you need to make the most effective decisions regarding your IT installations.

The complete white paper text with graphics and citations are also provided  via PDF version.

At Universal Networking Services, our philosophy is simple:  knowledge is key to data center efficiency! To explore more gateways to priceless educational opportunities please visit UNS’s Data Center Institute. We are proud to announce we offer customized on-site training available through UNS’s Data Center Institute Training Series. For more information on tailoring a custom training program specific to your facility’s needs please contact us .

Data Center Projects: Standardized Process (#140):

As the design and deployment of data center physical infrastructure moves away from art and move toward science, the benefits of a standardized and predictable process are becoming compelling. Beyond the ordering, delivery, and installation of hardware, any build or upgrade project depends critically upon a well-defined process as insurance against surprises, cost overruns, delays, and frustration. This paper presents an overview of a standardized, step-by-step process methodology that can be adapted and configured to suit individual requirements.

Data Center Projects: System Planning (White Paper #142 and Part 1 of 2 Podcast):

System planning is the Achilles’ heel of a data center physical infrastructure project. Planning mistakes can magnify and propagate through later deployment phases, resulting in delays, cost overruns, wasted time, and ultimately a compromised system. Much of the trouble can be eliminated by viewing system planning as a data flow model, with an orderly sequence of tasks that progressively transform and refine information from initial concept to final design

Data Center Projects: System Planning (White Paper #142 and Part 2 of 2 Podcast):

System planning is the Achilles’ heel of a data center physical infrastructure project. Planning mistakes can magnify and propagate through later deployment phases, resulting in delays, cost overruns, wasted time, and ultimately a compromised system. Much of the trouble can be eliminated by viewing system planning as a data flow model, with an orderly sequence of tasks that progressively transform and refine information from initial concept to final design.

A Quantitative Comparison of High Efficiency AC vs DC Power Distribution for Data Centers (#127):

A Quantitative Comparison of High Efficiency AC vs DC Power Distribution for Data Centers

Cooling Strategies for Ultra-High Density Racks and Blade Servers (#46):

Cooling Strategies for Ultra-High Density Racks and Blade Servers

Increasing Data Center Efficiency by Using Improved High Density Power Distribution (#128):

Increasing Data Center Efficiency by Using Improved High Density Power Distribution

Rack Powering Options for High Density (#29):

Alternatives for providing electrical power to high density racks in Data Centers and Network Rooms are explained and compared. Issues addressed include quantity of feeds, single-phase vs. three-phase, number and location of circuit breakers, overload, selection of plug types, selection of voltage, redundancy, and loss of redundancy. The need for the rack power system to adapt to changing requirements is identified and quantified. Guidelines are defined for rack power systems that can reliably deliver power to high density loads while adapting to changing needs.

The Seven Types of Power Problems (#18):

Many of the mysteries of equipment failure, downtime, software and data corruption, are often the result of a problematic supply of power. There is also a common problem with describing power problems in a standard way. This white paper will describe the most common types of power disturbances, what can cause them, what they can do to your critical equipment, and how to safeguard your equipment, using the IEEE standards for describing power quality problems.

Neutral Wire Facts and Mythology (#21):

This Technical Note discusses many common misunderstandings about the function of the neutral wire and its relation to power problems. The subjects of dedicated lines, phase reversal, isolation transformers, and grounding are addressed. Various myths are described and criticized.

Accounting and Tax Benefits of Modular, Portable Data Center Infrastructure (#115):

Well-informed accounting treatment of Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure (NCPI) assets provides significant opportunities to contribute to improving the financial performance of a business, institution, or organization. Design and manufacturing improvements in modular, scalable UPS systems, power distribution units (PDUs), and computer room air conditioners have not only created technological benefits, but provide entirely new NCPI asset management opportunities with direct and measurable financial benefits.

Understanding EPO and its Downtime Risks (#22):

An Emergency Power Off (EPO) system is intended to power down a single piece of electronic equipment or an entire installation from a single point by activating a push button. EPO is employed in many applications such as industrial processes and information technology (IT). This white paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of EPO for protecting data centers and small IT equipment rooms containing UPS systems. Various codes and standards that require EPO are discussed. Recommended practices are suggested for the use of EPO with UPS systems.

Essential NCPI Service Requirements for Next Generation Data Centers (#12):

Data Centers are a significant investment to the corporations and IT departments who they serve. Whether or not they actually achieve the availability of the design is highly dependent on the quality of the service personnel and their ability to meet the challenges specific to data center management. This paper presents a categorized and prioritized collection of those service challenges and the requirements needed to overcome them. It is based on information obtained in systematic interviews with data center clients and users.

Essential NCPI Management Requirements for Next Generation Data Centers (#14):

The management of physical infrastructure in data centers can no longer be considered independently of the IT management architecture. In order to manage rapid change and achieve demanded levels of availability while controlling Total Cost of Ownership, IT managers can no longer afford to rely on the primitive, customized management solutions of the past. These solutions are no longer effective and must be replaced by systems based on, and integrated with, open IT management standards. With this in mind, this paper describes the requirements for management of next-generation Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure from the perspective of the ITIL framework.

Watts and Volt-Amps: Powerful Confusion (#15):

This note helps explain the differences between Watts and VA and explains how the terms are correctly and incorrectly used in specifying power protection equipment.

Reducing the Hidden Costs Associated with Upgrades of Data Center Power Capacity(#73):

Failure to adopt modular standardization as a design strategy for Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure (NCPI) is costly on all fronts: unnecessary expense, avoidable downtime, and lost business opportunity. Standardization and its close relative, modularity, create wideranging benefits in NCPI that streamline and simplify every process from initial planning to daily operation, with significant positive effects on all three major components of NCPI business value – availability, agility, and total cost of ownership.

Standardization and Modularity in Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure (#116):

Description: Failure to adopt modular standardization as a design strategy for Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure (NCPI) is costly on all fronts: unnecessary expense, avoidable downtime, and lost business opportunity. Standardization and its close relative, modularity, create wide-ranging benefits in NCPI that streamline and simplify every process from initial planning to daily operation, with significant positive effects on all three major components of NCPI business value – availability, agility, and total cost of ownership.interpretation.

Mean Time Between Failure: Explanation and Standards (#78):

Description: Mean Time Between Failure is a reliability term used loosely throughout many industries and has become widely abused in some. Over the years the original meaning of this term has been altered which has led to confusion and cynicism. MTBF is largely based on assumptions and definition of failure and attention to these details are paramount to proper interpretation. This paper explains the underlying complexities and misconceptions of MTBF and the methods available for estimating it.

Ten Steps to Solving Cooling Problems Caused by High Density Server Deployment (#42):

High-density servers present a significant challenge. Here is a 10-step approach for cooling efficiency, cooling compactly and power density in existing data centers.

Monitoring Physical Threats in the Data Center (#102):

Excerpt of APC white paper #102 discusses monitoring physical threats in the data center.

Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure: Optimizing Business Value (#117):

Excerpt of APC white paper #117 discusses network-critical physical infrastructure (NCPI).

Strategies for Deploying Blade Servers in Existing Data Centers (#125):

Excerpt of APC white paper #117 discusses network-critical physical infrastructure (NCPI).

The Advantages of Row and Rack-Oriented Architectures for Data Centers ( #130, Part 1 of 2):

Latest generation high/variable density IT equipment creates conditions that room cooling was never intended to address. Part one reviews room-, row- and rack-based cooling architectures that can address these issues.

The Advantages of Row and Rack-Oriented Architectures for Data Centers ( #130, Part 2 of 2):

Description: Latest generation high/varible density IT equipment it equipment creates conditions that room cooling was never intended to address. Row- and rack-oriented cooling architectures address these issues. Excerpt two offers a comparison of these architectures.

Implementing Energy Efficient Data Centers ( #114):

Description: Electricity usage costs have become an increasing fraction of the total cost of ownership (TCO) for data centers. Learn how to quantify electricity savings gained through appropriate design of the network-critical physical infrastructure and IT architecture.

Avoiding Costs from Oversizing Data Center and Network Room Infrastructure (#37):

Description: The single largest avoidable cost associated with typical data center and network room infrastructure is oversizing. Learn how you can prevent this unnecessary cost.

Management Strategy for Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure ( #100):

Description: Strategies for choosing a management solution for the physical infrastructure of IT networks, where management of individual devices is necessary to have visibility to the many data points required for reliable operation

APC InfraStruxure™ : On-Demand Architecture for Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure

Posted by on February 7, 2012  |  No Comments


InfraStruxure Data Centers Mean Business

APC InfraStruxure™ is the scalable and adaptable data center IT room architecture that dramatically reduces time and complexity from concept and design through installation. Power, cooling, racks, security and management components are conceived and tested as part of an integrated system which is evident in the aesthetics, functionality and ease of management software integration. Taking a broad system view enables full realization of the benefits of going fast, going dense and going green while ensuring your critical availability targets are met. An open system, InfraStruxure™ is the proven “on demand” architecture for data center IT rooms small and large, delivering high availability and real energy savings whether deployed on its own, in a zone, or in incremental steps.


This new generation of InfraStruxure™ delivers:

  • Higher performance – 25 percent increase in power and cooling capacity, 15 percent smaller footprint
  • More scalability – as big as you want to go
  • Faster and easier planning through operations – automated planning and design tools with open & integrated management and operations software
  • More innovation and leadership – from the worlds leader in data center physical infrastructure all while reducing cost!

View the Next Generation of InfraStruxure™ Video Animation

View the Next Generation of InfraStruxure™ Brochure

To learn more about APC InfraStruxure™ please contact Waite Ave at w.ave@apcdistributors.com or 1-888-486-7725, ext. 201.







APC Expands InRow® Cooling Product Family with InRow OA and Refrigerant Distribution Unit

Posted by on September 1, 2010  |  No Comments

Energy Efficient, Overhead Cooling Solution for Medium to Large DataCenter Environments

West Kingston, RI, August 16, 2010 — APC by Schneider Electric, a global leader in integrated critical power and cooling services, today announced the InRow® OA and Refrigerant Distribution Unit (RDU) pumped refrigerant cooling system. The APC InRow OA expands APC’s leading InRow product line by providing an overhead, energy efficient, refrigerant based cooling solution for data center environments.

“Data center densities continue to increase and efficiency concerns encourage customers to maximize all the available space for physical infrastructure,” said Dave Guidette, senior vice president, Enterprise Systems, Services & Software, APC. “The new APC InRow OA and RDU provide data center managers with increased flexibility by eliminating the need to remove or break-up racks to implement a row-based cooling architecture to meet the needs of higher density loads.”

Ideal for medium and high density applications, the new APC InRow OA captures up to 27kW of hot IT exhaust air at the source, neutralizes it and discharges cool, ambient air to the IT space. The OA includes integrated thermal containment, which eliminates mixing of hot and cold air streams – improving cooling predictability. Modular construction, variable speed fans, and active response controls are all integrated into one high efficiency system. The over head design requires zero whitespace, because it can be mounted on a rack or suspended from the ceiling above the hot aisle, improving flexibility and the ability to adapt to existing data center environments.

This refrigerant based system has been developed to eliminate the threat from water leaks in close proximity to IT equipment. The refrigerant used in this modular, pumped system is R134a, a non-toxic solution that poses no threat to IT equipment in the event of a leak, and has no Ozone depletion potential.

The RDU is a refrigerant distribution unit capable of providing 160kW of heat rejection to the APC InRow OA cooling units, and its modular construction, variable speed pumps, and active response controls are integrated into the highly efficient variable volume pumping system. The RDU has the ability to modulate capacity from 0-100 percent with no minimum loading requirements and may be placed in the IT environment or in an adjacent location to further increase whitespace utilization for IT equipment.

Other key components to this system include modular piping headers and the mounting structure of the APC InRow OA. The piping headers are an integrated part of the mounting structure of the APC InRow OA to simplify installation and reduce initial investment costs.

Key benefits of new APC InRow OA include:
· Ability to maximize available floor space for IT equipment
· Address concerns of water in the data center
· 30-50% more efficient than traditional raised floor data center cooling
· Elimination of hot spots caused by high density deployments
· Flexibility to easily deploy and redeploy cooling
· Simple to install minimizing initial investment

The new APC InRow OA and Refrigerant Distribution Unit are currently available in worldwide