Posts Tagged UPS

Battery Technology for Data Centers and Network Rooms: Site Planning

Posted by on June 18, 2012  |  No Comments

White Paper 33

Batteries for uninterruptible power systems (UPS) are almost universally of the lead-acid type and are of one of the following three technologies:

  1. Vented (flooded or wet cells
  2. Valve regulated (VRLA)
  3. Modular battery cartridges (MB)

Please refer to White Paper 30, Battery Technology for the Data Centers and Network Rooms: Lead-Acid Battery Options , for more details.

“Battery Technology for Data Centers and Network Rooms: Site Planning” Full White Paper (Click Here To Download)

Executive Summary:

The site requirements and costs for protecting information technology and network environments are impacted by the choice of uninterrupted power supply (UPS) battery technology. This paper will discuss how battery technologies impact site requirements.

Contents:

  • Adaptability
  • Planning issues

Conclusion:

IT systems present a rapidly changing requirement for data center infrastructure. Fast response to this change can be difficult but can be facilitated by the appropriate selection of UPS battery technology.

The different battery technologies now available vary considerably in their site planning requirements and in their ability to create battery systems that can adapt to changing requirements.

A typical data center design process focuses on power and runtime as the drivers in battery selection and cost. An alternative approach is to focus on how adaptable the battery system needs to be to changing requirements. This approach can give rise to dramatic savings over the life of the system.

White Paper Written By:

Stephen McCluer is a Senior Manager for external codes and standards at Schneider Electric. He has 30 years of experience in the power protection industry, and is a member of NFPA, ICC, IAEI, ASHRAE, The Green Grid, BICSI, and the IEEE Standards Council. He serves on a number of committees within those organizations, is a frequent speaker at industry conferences, and authors technical papers and articles on power quality topics. He served on a task group to rewrite the requirements for information technology equipment in the 2011 National Electrical Code.

Universal Networking Services’s partnership with Universal Power Group, Inc. has enabled us to build a strong distribution network of battery and related power components that meet consumer needs for accessibility, portability, security and mobility, coupled with value added offerings such as battery pack assembly and battery replacement/recycling programs.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions regarding this topic.

Battery Technology for Data Centers and Network Rooms: Lifecycle Costs

Posted by on June 11, 2012  |  No Comments

White Paper 35

Lead-acid batteries are the predominant choice for uninterruptible power supply (UPS) energy storage for data centers and network rooms. This white paper will compare the lifecycle costs the three lead-acid battery technologies, vented (flooded, also called wet cells), valve regulated (VRLA), and modular battery cartridges (MBC). Please see White Paper 30, Battery Technologies for Data Centers and Network Rooms: Battery Options for more information about the different types of battery technologies.

Each installation is unique and results in different costs. This paper uses estimates from several different sources. While every effort was made to ensure accuracy, the examples in this paper are only a guideline and factors relating to a particular installation must be incorporated for decision-making and budgetary purposes.

“Battery Technology for Data Centers and Network Rooms: Lifecycle Costs” Full White Paper (Click To Download Here)

Executive Summary:

The lifecycle cost of different UPS battery technologies is compared. The costs associated with the purchase of batteries, the infrastructure costs, and the costs associated with inflexibility to meet changing requirements are discussed and quantified.

Contents:

  • Lifecycle Costs
  • Selection factors other than lifecycle costs

Conclusion:

This analysis finds large differences in the life-cycle costs of the different UPS battery technologies. After reviewing all three steps it is clear that a MBC battery solution can offer over 50% savings over VRLA and flooded battery solutions. Often only the battery system costs are compared and then the differences might not be compelling enough to warrant a switch from a known technology. When the infrastructure costs are added the lifecycle savings between the technologies is dramatic. This is why of the UPS sold each year world wide, over 99% use VRLA batteries or MBC. The adaptability of MBC increases the speed of deployment and can allow recovery of the 75% of cost the average data center loses due to oversizing.

Factors relating to system availability have driven some installations to deploy flooded cells despite the lower life cycle cost of VRLA or MBC batteries. The technology of the MBC battery system specifically addresses many of these issues.

When compared with flooded cell battery systems, the MBC can save over 90% in life cycle costs in a real-world situation. Most of this cost advantage results from the ability to size the battery system to the current requirement and add as needed to meet changing requirements.

In cases where the ultimate load value is pre-determined and full utilization is achieved at the first commissioning of the system, much of the advantage of the MBC battery system is lost. However, the engineering, installation, and maintenance cost advantages still provide a savings of up to 60% when compared with flooded cells.

White Paper Written By:

Stephen McCluer is a Senior Manager for external codes and standards at Schneider Electric. He has 30 years of experience in the power protection industry, and is a member of NFPA, ICC, IAEI, ASHRAE, The Green Grid, BICSI, and the IEEE Standards Council. He serves on a number of committees within those organizations, is a frequent speaker at industry conferences, and authors technical papers and articles on power quality topics. He served on a task group to rewrite the requirements for information technology equipment in the 2011 National Electrical Code.

Universal Networking Services’s partnership with Universal Power Group, Inc. has enabled us to build a strong distribution network of battery and related power components that meet consumer needs for accessibility, portability, security and mobility, coupled with value added offerings such as battery pack assembly and battery replacement/recycling programs.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions regarding this topic.

Battery Technology for Data Centers and Network Rooms: Lead-Acid Battery Options

Posted by on June 4, 2012  |  1 Comment

White Paper 30

Energy storage technologies in data centers play an important role in maintaining system uptime. Should utility power fail, the first line of defense is usually batteries that are incorporated as part of an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) system. Although alternative energy storage technologies such as fuel cells, flywheels, lithium ion, and nickel cadmium batteries are being explored (see White Paper 65, Comparing Data Center Batteries, Flywheels, and Ultracapacitors for more details) data center and network room UPS systems almost exclusively utilize lead-acid batteries. This paper reviews and compares the three major lead-acid battery technologies available today.

“Battery Technology for Data Centers and Network Rooms: Lead-Acid Battery Options” Full White Paper (Click Here To Download)

Executive Summary:

The lead-acid battery is the predominant choice for uninterruptible power supply (UPS) energy storage. Over 10 million UPSs are presently installed utilizing flooded, valve regulated lead acid (VRLA), and modular battery cartridge (MBC) systems. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these three lead-acid battery technologies.

Contents:

  • Lead-acid battery technologies
  • Attributes

Conclusion:

Vented (flooded or wet cell) batteries have a very long life but present significant complexity of installation and maintenance, the most significant being the need to build a separate battery room. These limitations have historically restricted the application of vented cells to very high power installations.

The VRLA battery was developed in response to the limitations of the wet-cell battery, and provides significant benefits in the area of installation costs, maintenance costs, energy density and safety. However, VRLA reliability can be compromised through improper installation and / or misapplication. Although the battery life of the MBC is shorter than that of vented cells, the benefits of this technology, even with a shorter battery life, present a compelling value proposition for today’s data centers and network rooms, especially in systems smaller than 500 kW.

All of the hazardous failure modes can be controlled by appropriate system design. Parallel string designs, ventilation, overcharge protection, temperature compensated charging, and battery monitoring are the principal techniques utilized to eliminate battery failure hazards.

White Paper Written By:

Stephen McCluer is a Senior Manager for external codes and standards at Schneider Electric. He has 30 years of experience in the power protection industry, and is a member of NFPA, ICC, IAEI, ASHRAE, The Green Grid, BICSI, and the IEEE Standards Council. He serves on a number of committees within those organizations, is a frequent speaker at industry conferences, and authors technical papers and articles on power quality topics. He served on a task group to rewrite the requirements for information technology equipment in the 2011 National Electrical Code.

Universal Networking Services brings a comprehensive solution from the utility pole to the server and assists with navigating the complex waters of most size and scope of projects. Whether you are upgrading, retrofitting or developing a new design-build, UNS and its partners generate efficient, scalable, reliable and manageable critical infrastructure solutions to your organization. Our holistic, common sense approach lowers our clients Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and maximizes efficiencies offered by the advancements in critical power and cooling infrastructure.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions regarding this topic.


Make Your Data Center More Efficient-TradeOff™ Tools

Posted by on April 25, 2012  |  No Comments

APC TradeOff ToolsTM, are web-based applications with easy-to-use interfaces designed for use in the early stages of data center concept and design development. By enabling data center professionals to experiment with various scenarios regarding virtualization, efficiency, power sizing, capital costs, and other key design issues, APC TradeOff Tools break down major data center planning decisions into a series of smaller, more manageable decisions. Use of these tools helps validate, through modeling, the overall design of a data center.

What are TradeOff Tools?

TradeOff Tools are simple, interactive tools, based on data and science, that make it easy to vary parameters, experiment with “what if” scenarios and make tradeoffs during data center planning.

  • Simple, automated tools to support specific planning decisions
  • Models complex interactions of systems based on data and science
  • One-screen, standardized user interface
  • Instant output allows for rapid creation of “what if” scenarios

When should they be used?

Used early in the planning process, TradeOff Tools help avoid planning roadblocks by making informed and accurate decisions

How do they help in planning a data center?

TradeOff Tools help show quantifiable, tangible benefits of implementing certain technologies and justify project decisions.

Video Tutorial Presentation of APC TradeOff Tools™

Data Center Efficiency Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of alternative power and cooling approaches on energy costs.

The purpose of this tool is to show how various design decisions and operating conditions affect the efficiency and electrical costs of a typical generic data center.  As the user inputs details regarding the power and cooling configuration results are calculated based upon a tested and validated three parameter model.

Profiles a data center and calculates the resulting efficiency and electrical cost based on data center characteristics. Users can then understand the impact each key data center decision has on the data center’s efficiency.

Cooling Economizer Mode PUE Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of geography and cooling characteristics on PUE, energy cost, and carbon emissions.

The purpose of this tool is to compare seven common cooling architectures and demonstrate their expected annual PUE, energy cost, and carbon emissions.  As the user inputs details such as the data center location and power & cooling configuration inputs such as IT inlet temperature, % load, and type of power & lighting, results are calculated.

UPS Efficiency Comparison Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of UPS efficiencies on energy costs and carbon footprint.

The purpose of this tool is to compare the efficiencies of two UPS systems and to show the impact these efficiencies have on electricity cost and carbon footprint.  UPSs may be selected from a pull down list, or users can define their own UPS (Schneider Electric or other vendor).  Pre-populated data was obtained by curve fitting to measured efficiency data .  All measurements were taken in normal operating mode, at typical environmental conditions, with nominal elctrical input and balanced resistive load (PF=1.0) output.

Data Center Carbon Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of changes in data center efficiency on energy costs and carbon footprint.

The purpose of this tool is to recognize how “green” a data center is by converting energy usage rates into carbon emissions. The tool illustrates how hypothetical changes to a data center’s location, efficiency, and power load can impact carbon dioxide emissions and the electric bill.

Illustrates how changes to a data center’s location, efficiency, and power load can impact carbon dioxide emissions and the electric bill. This provides management with a general indication of how “green” their data center is today and how “green” it could be.

Data Center Design Planning Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of physical infrastructure technology and growth plan strategies on key design parameters.

This tool allows key decision makers to analyze these parameters, evaluate tradeoffs, and make decisions, to avoid costly mistakes that can magnify and propagate through later deployment phases.

IT Carbon & Energy Allocation Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of efficiency, load characteristics, and location on energy and carbon allocation for IT users.

The purpose of the tool is to help data center operators assign carbon and energy costs to IT users. Energy (cost) and carbon allocations are computed on a per-server basis, based on an “average” server.  The units of “average” server can then be apportioned to the IT users using a method od choice depending on the business model.  This tool allows IT users to make smarter decisions regarding their total cost, as they consider options such as virtualization and server retirement.

Virtualization Energy Cost Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of server virtualization and data center design choices on energy and space savings.

This tool illustrates potential IT, physical infrastructure, and energy savings resulting from the virtualization of servers. It allows the user to input data regarding data center capacity, load, number of servers, energy cost, and other data center elements.

Comprehends IT and physical infrastructure characteristics and calculates energy savings resulting from the virtualization of servers. This allows the user to test the impact of virtualization and various physical infrastructure improvements on their data center floor space and on their energy consumption.

Data Center Capital Cost Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of physical infrastructure design changes on capital costs.

This tool identifies calculates capital costs based on parameters including load, redundancy, density, and power/cooling characteristics, the tool can project the number of racks required and the floor space required.

Identifies key data center physical infrastructure parameters and calculates capital costs based on those parameters. This allows data center users to judge how changes to data center location, IT load, and cooling and power infrastructure can impact overall capital costs

Data Center Power Sizing Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of server and storage configurations on IT load capacity and required utility input power.

This tool defines basic characteristics of the IT load and calculates how much utility input power would be required to support that load, allowing users to experiment with “what if” scenarios by modifying the load characteristics of servers, mainframes, and storage. Total load is then calculated and the tool generates a corresponding utility power requirement.

Defines basic characteristics of the IT load and calculates how much utility input power would be required to support such a load. This provides users with a general idea of how much power in kilowatts they will need to run their data center.

Data Center AC vs. DC Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact on data center efficiency of various AC and DC power distribution architectures.

Users can compare the energy efficiency of four different power distribution architectures, including Legacy AC (typically 208 V with older data center UPS, PDU, and IT power supplies), Best Practice AC (208 V with latest generation UPS, PDU, and IT power supplies), 415 V AC (same modern components as Best Practice AC, but eliminates the PDUs and assumes 230 V AC power supplies), and 380 V DC (uses a theoretical DC UPS, no PDUs, and IT power supplies with 1.5% efficiency benefit).

Compares four different AC and DC power distribution architectures and calculates their respective efficiencies. This allows the user to make an educated decision on the optimal architecture for their data cente

Data Center InRow™ Containment Selector (Click Here To Download):

Impact of preferences and constraints on the recommended containment approach.

This tool generates a prototype rack and row cooling configuration based on the user’s layout preferences and the physical constraints of the room.

Generates a prototype rack and row cooling configuration based on the user’s preferences and the physical constraints of the room. This provides the user with their optimal InRow cooling containment configuration.

InRow Ancillary IT Equipment Cooling Calculator (Click Here To Download):

Impact of IT, cooling, & room characteristics on ability for row-based cooling to support ancillary IT loads.

This calculator helps the data center designer determine if additional cooling must be provided or if the existing row-based cooling is sufficient as miscellaneous ancillary IT equipment is added outside of the rows, such as tape silos, storage equipment, and networking gear.

Find out how Universal Networking Services brings a comprehensive solution from the utility pole to the server and assists with navigating the complex waters of most size and scope of projects. Whether you are upgrading, retrofitting or developing a new design-build, UNS and its partners generate efficient, scalable, reliable and manageable critical infrastructure solutions to your organization. Our holistic, common sense approach lowers our clients Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and maximizes efficiencies offered by the advancements in critical power and cooling infrastructure.

Please feel free to contact us to learn more.

Schneider Electric’s APC Silcon Series UPS Reached End of Life

Posted by on February 20, 2012  |  No Comments

Schneider Electric’s APC Silcon Series UPS Reached End of Life.

At this time, if you have an APC Silcon Series UPS unit installed at your site location we strongly recommend that you begin planning to replace your Silcon Series UPS system.  The APC Silcon Series UPS was discontinued on September 30, 2006 and is no longer being manufactured. APC guarantees 10 years of support on spare parts from the last day of production, making the final day for guaranteed support September 30, 2016.  Although APC has agreed to support the units from a maintenance standpoint, the parts will not always be available for immediate replacement.  For example, components not readily available, such as the Inverter sections and Capacitor banks, will need to be custom built, resulting in mean time to repair rates of several months.

Should you decide to maintain/service your APC Silcon unit past 2016,  Schneider Electric cannot guarantee parts availability or an available trained field technician in the event of an emergency.

APC Silcon Series End of Life/End of Service – Important Notes:

End of Life (September 30, 2006):
  • The last date of production for the APC Silcon line of UPS was September 30, 2006.  If you currently own and operate an APC Silcon unit you are beyond it’s recommended life.
  • Until the 5th year after cease of production (September 30, 2011), APC guarantees delivery of spare parts as fast as possible but lead time is highly dependent on stock availability and manufacturing time of the spare part.  After that time, lead time is expected to be several months.
End of Service (September 30, 2016):
  • You will not be able to renew the Schneider Electric on-site service contracts beyond September 30, 2016.  Preventative maintenance visits and on site service calls will no longer be available.
  • Schneider Electric’s supply of available spare parts for these models is fast diminishing as some parts are no longer in production by the component manufacturer.  Consider, aged capacitors can and charge circuits might not allow your batteries to charge and discharge the way they used to, resulting in more frequent battery changes.  Constant running, multi-speed fans have a life expectancy of 3 years.  Should they fail, the internal safety mechanisms present in most UPS systems force a shut down on high heat.  Even if it’s a simple fix, parts may no longer be available, or at best, require longer shipping times due to proximity of existing stock.
  • Schneider Electric factory trained technicians and technical support personnel will no longer stay current in relation to this product family.

With today’s newer, hot-swappable designed UPS systems, such as the Symmetra UPS, our industry is finally in a position to break free of our dependency on high cost service contracts.  By design, the APC Symmetra UPS encourages a company’s IT staff with minimal training or experience to make repairs without ever contacting their service provider in the first place.  After all, the UPS is smart enough to diagnose a fault and intelligent enough to know if that fault warrants an all out shutdown, or simply to issue a fault alarm to their owner.  Armed with the knowledge that their entire UPS, from battery modules to static switch assembly can be changed on-the-fly.

We would welcome an opportunity to discuss the various product replacement options for the APC Silcon Series UPS.  APC Smart-UPS and APC Symmetra PX line of products are excellent considerations based on your facility’s specific requirements.

To learn more about Schneider Electric’s line of UPS products and the Trade-UPS program please contact Waite Ave at w.ave@apcdistributors.com or 1-888-486-7725, ext. 201.

MGE EPS 3000 End of Service Announcement

Posted by on February 9, 2012  |  No Comments

Schneider Electric has announced it will no longer support the MGE EPS 3000 series UPS as of December 31, 2011.

At this time, if you have a MGE EPS 3000 unit installed at your site location we strongly recommend that you begin planning to replace your EPS 3000 UPS system.  Should you decide to maintain your EPS 3000 unit past 2011, Schneider Electric cannot guarantee parts availability or an available trained field technician in the event of an emergency.

MGE EPS 3000 End of Service – Important Notes

  • The last date of production for the EPS 3000 line of UPS was November 2000.  If you currently own and operate a MGE EPS 3000 you are beyond it’s recommended life.
  • You will not be able to renew the Schneider Electric on-site service contracts beyond 12/31/11. Preventative maintenance visits and on site service calls will no longer be available.
  • Schneider Electric’s supply of available spare parts for these models is fast diminishing as some parts are no longer in production by the component manufacturer.
  • Schneider Electric factory trained technicians and technical support personnel will no longer stay current in relation to this product family.

We would welcome an opportunity to discuss the various product replacement options as support for the MGE EPS 3000 officially came to an end in 2011.  APC-Smart UPS and APC Symmetra PX line of products are excellent considerations based on your facility’s specific requirements.

To learn more about Schneider Electric’s line of UPS products and the Trade-UPS program please contact Waite Ave at w.ave@apcdistributors.com or 1-888-486-7725, ext. 201.


APC White Paper Podcasts Directory

Posted by on February 7, 2012  |  No Comments

Waite Ave, Vice President of Operations

We hope you enjoy this directory of APC’s White Paper Podcasts.  Listen when you want, where you want. Learn what you need to know! APC’s Podcasts provide you a convenient way to stay informed on current trends in the data center.

These recorded excerpts of APC’s most popular white papers provide the techniques, guidelines and tools you need to make the most effective decisions regarding your IT installations.

The complete white paper text with graphics and citations are also provided  via PDF version.

At Universal Networking Services, our philosophy is simple:  knowledge is key to data center efficiency! To explore more gateways to priceless educational opportunities please visit UNS’s Data Center Institute. We are proud to announce we offer customized on-site training available through UNS’s Data Center Institute Training Series. For more information on tailoring a custom training program specific to your facility’s needs please contact us .

Data Center Projects: Standardized Process (#140):

As the design and deployment of data center physical infrastructure moves away from art and move toward science, the benefits of a standardized and predictable process are becoming compelling. Beyond the ordering, delivery, and installation of hardware, any build or upgrade project depends critically upon a well-defined process as insurance against surprises, cost overruns, delays, and frustration. This paper presents an overview of a standardized, step-by-step process methodology that can be adapted and configured to suit individual requirements.

Data Center Projects: System Planning (White Paper #142 and Part 1 of 2 Podcast):

System planning is the Achilles’ heel of a data center physical infrastructure project. Planning mistakes can magnify and propagate through later deployment phases, resulting in delays, cost overruns, wasted time, and ultimately a compromised system. Much of the trouble can be eliminated by viewing system planning as a data flow model, with an orderly sequence of tasks that progressively transform and refine information from initial concept to final design

Data Center Projects: System Planning (White Paper #142 and Part 2 of 2 Podcast):

System planning is the Achilles’ heel of a data center physical infrastructure project. Planning mistakes can magnify and propagate through later deployment phases, resulting in delays, cost overruns, wasted time, and ultimately a compromised system. Much of the trouble can be eliminated by viewing system planning as a data flow model, with an orderly sequence of tasks that progressively transform and refine information from initial concept to final design.

A Quantitative Comparison of High Efficiency AC vs DC Power Distribution for Data Centers (#127):

A Quantitative Comparison of High Efficiency AC vs DC Power Distribution for Data Centers

Cooling Strategies for Ultra-High Density Racks and Blade Servers (#46):

Cooling Strategies for Ultra-High Density Racks and Blade Servers

Increasing Data Center Efficiency by Using Improved High Density Power Distribution (#128):

Increasing Data Center Efficiency by Using Improved High Density Power Distribution

Rack Powering Options for High Density (#29):

Alternatives for providing electrical power to high density racks in Data Centers and Network Rooms are explained and compared. Issues addressed include quantity of feeds, single-phase vs. three-phase, number and location of circuit breakers, overload, selection of plug types, selection of voltage, redundancy, and loss of redundancy. The need for the rack power system to adapt to changing requirements is identified and quantified. Guidelines are defined for rack power systems that can reliably deliver power to high density loads while adapting to changing needs.

The Seven Types of Power Problems (#18):

Many of the mysteries of equipment failure, downtime, software and data corruption, are often the result of a problematic supply of power. There is also a common problem with describing power problems in a standard way. This white paper will describe the most common types of power disturbances, what can cause them, what they can do to your critical equipment, and how to safeguard your equipment, using the IEEE standards for describing power quality problems.

Neutral Wire Facts and Mythology (#21):

This Technical Note discusses many common misunderstandings about the function of the neutral wire and its relation to power problems. The subjects of dedicated lines, phase reversal, isolation transformers, and grounding are addressed. Various myths are described and criticized.

Accounting and Tax Benefits of Modular, Portable Data Center Infrastructure (#115):

Well-informed accounting treatment of Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure (NCPI) assets provides significant opportunities to contribute to improving the financial performance of a business, institution, or organization. Design and manufacturing improvements in modular, scalable UPS systems, power distribution units (PDUs), and computer room air conditioners have not only created technological benefits, but provide entirely new NCPI asset management opportunities with direct and measurable financial benefits.

Understanding EPO and its Downtime Risks (#22):

An Emergency Power Off (EPO) system is intended to power down a single piece of electronic equipment or an entire installation from a single point by activating a push button. EPO is employed in many applications such as industrial processes and information technology (IT). This white paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of EPO for protecting data centers and small IT equipment rooms containing UPS systems. Various codes and standards that require EPO are discussed. Recommended practices are suggested for the use of EPO with UPS systems.

Essential NCPI Service Requirements for Next Generation Data Centers (#12):

Data Centers are a significant investment to the corporations and IT departments who they serve. Whether or not they actually achieve the availability of the design is highly dependent on the quality of the service personnel and their ability to meet the challenges specific to data center management. This paper presents a categorized and prioritized collection of those service challenges and the requirements needed to overcome them. It is based on information obtained in systematic interviews with data center clients and users.

Essential NCPI Management Requirements for Next Generation Data Centers (#14):

The management of physical infrastructure in data centers can no longer be considered independently of the IT management architecture. In order to manage rapid change and achieve demanded levels of availability while controlling Total Cost of Ownership, IT managers can no longer afford to rely on the primitive, customized management solutions of the past. These solutions are no longer effective and must be replaced by systems based on, and integrated with, open IT management standards. With this in mind, this paper describes the requirements for management of next-generation Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure from the perspective of the ITIL framework.

Watts and Volt-Amps: Powerful Confusion (#15):

This note helps explain the differences between Watts and VA and explains how the terms are correctly and incorrectly used in specifying power protection equipment.

Reducing the Hidden Costs Associated with Upgrades of Data Center Power Capacity(#73):

Failure to adopt modular standardization as a design strategy for Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure (NCPI) is costly on all fronts: unnecessary expense, avoidable downtime, and lost business opportunity. Standardization and its close relative, modularity, create wideranging benefits in NCPI that streamline and simplify every process from initial planning to daily operation, with significant positive effects on all three major components of NCPI business value – availability, agility, and total cost of ownership.

Standardization and Modularity in Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure (#116):

Description: Failure to adopt modular standardization as a design strategy for Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure (NCPI) is costly on all fronts: unnecessary expense, avoidable downtime, and lost business opportunity. Standardization and its close relative, modularity, create wide-ranging benefits in NCPI that streamline and simplify every process from initial planning to daily operation, with significant positive effects on all three major components of NCPI business value – availability, agility, and total cost of ownership.interpretation.

Mean Time Between Failure: Explanation and Standards (#78):

Description: Mean Time Between Failure is a reliability term used loosely throughout many industries and has become widely abused in some. Over the years the original meaning of this term has been altered which has led to confusion and cynicism. MTBF is largely based on assumptions and definition of failure and attention to these details are paramount to proper interpretation. This paper explains the underlying complexities and misconceptions of MTBF and the methods available for estimating it.

Ten Steps to Solving Cooling Problems Caused by High Density Server Deployment (#42):

High-density servers present a significant challenge. Here is a 10-step approach for cooling efficiency, cooling compactly and power density in existing data centers.

Monitoring Physical Threats in the Data Center (#102):

Excerpt of APC white paper #102 discusses monitoring physical threats in the data center.

Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure: Optimizing Business Value (#117):

Excerpt of APC white paper #117 discusses network-critical physical infrastructure (NCPI).

Strategies for Deploying Blade Servers in Existing Data Centers (#125):

Excerpt of APC white paper #117 discusses network-critical physical infrastructure (NCPI).

The Advantages of Row and Rack-Oriented Architectures for Data Centers ( #130, Part 1 of 2):

Latest generation high/variable density IT equipment creates conditions that room cooling was never intended to address. Part one reviews room-, row- and rack-based cooling architectures that can address these issues.

The Advantages of Row and Rack-Oriented Architectures for Data Centers ( #130, Part 2 of 2):

Description: Latest generation high/varible density IT equipment it equipment creates conditions that room cooling was never intended to address. Row- and rack-oriented cooling architectures address these issues. Excerpt two offers a comparison of these architectures.

Implementing Energy Efficient Data Centers ( #114):

Description: Electricity usage costs have become an increasing fraction of the total cost of ownership (TCO) for data centers. Learn how to quantify electricity savings gained through appropriate design of the network-critical physical infrastructure and IT architecture.

Avoiding Costs from Oversizing Data Center and Network Room Infrastructure (#37):

Description: The single largest avoidable cost associated with typical data center and network room infrastructure is oversizing. Learn how you can prevent this unnecessary cost.

Management Strategy for Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure ( #100):

Description: Strategies for choosing a management solution for the physical infrastructure of IT networks, where management of individual devices is necessary to have visibility to the many data points required for reliable operation

Seven Principles of APC InfraStruxure™ Design

Posted by on February 7, 2012  |  No Comments

7 Principles of InfraStruXure® HD-Ready Architecture

APC’s award winning InfraStruxure architecture provides an integrated and compatible solution at data centre rack, row and room level. Seven basic principles allow it to be installed into almost any environment, new or old, to provide highly scalable and highly manageable, efficient infrastructure for high density IT equipment.

Seven Principles of InfraStruxure™ Design Video


1. High Density Rack Enclosures
APC’s vendor-neutral NetShelter racks are engineered to accommodate standard sized IT equipment and to ensure that airflow and energy can be provisioned for today’s power hungry devices.

2. Rack and U-level outlet control
Install metered outlet strips to indicate which racks and outlets have available capacity for high density equipment. This provides a ready method for easy decision making regarding server placement in cramped racks.

3. Rack temperature monitoring
Local or remote monitoring of temperature and humidity in equipment racks enables data centre managers to ensure hot spots aren’t emerging as workloads increase.

4. Real-time browser based visibility
Providing real-time, system-wide data on power, cooling and physical security systems at row, rack and U-level through one standard IP address.

5. Software to manage capacity and change
Takes the guesswork out of server placement, basing decision-making on available power and cooling capacity. This effectively eliminates downtime caused by overloaded circuits or exceeded cooling capacity.

6. InRow cooling
As power and heat density per rack increases, hotspots which are a common feature in perimeter cooled environments can be eliminated. This also reduces energy costs as focussed, close coupled cooling eliminates the need to crank up room cooling solutions for the benefit of one or two zones of high density equipment.

7. Flexible, scalable UPS power
As UPS power demand grows, respond quickly and efficiently without wasteful oversizing or upfront capital costs. APC’s range includes scalable in-row, in-room or grey space solutions to meet your requirements.

To learn more about APC InfraStruxure™ please contact Waite Ave at w.ave@apcdistributors.com or 1-888-486-7725.

APC InfraStruxure™ : On-Demand Architecture for Network-Critical Physical Infrastructure

Posted by on February 7, 2012  |  No Comments


InfraStruxure Data Centers Mean Business

APC InfraStruxure™ is the scalable and adaptable data center IT room architecture that dramatically reduces time and complexity from concept and design through installation. Power, cooling, racks, security and management components are conceived and tested as part of an integrated system which is evident in the aesthetics, functionality and ease of management software integration. Taking a broad system view enables full realization of the benefits of going fast, going dense and going green while ensuring your critical availability targets are met. An open system, InfraStruxure™ is the proven “on demand” architecture for data center IT rooms small and large, delivering high availability and real energy savings whether deployed on its own, in a zone, or in incremental steps.


This new generation of InfraStruxure™ delivers:

  • Higher performance – 25 percent increase in power and cooling capacity, 15 percent smaller footprint
  • More scalability – as big as you want to go
  • Faster and easier planning through operations – automated planning and design tools with open & integrated management and operations software
  • More innovation and leadership – from the worlds leader in data center physical infrastructure all while reducing cost!

View the Next Generation of InfraStruxure™ Video Animation

View the Next Generation of InfraStruxure™ Brochure

To learn more about APC InfraStruxure™ please contact Waite Ave at w.ave@apcdistributors.com or 1-888-486-7725, ext. 201.







APC Symmetra PX: Agile

Posted by on February 6, 2012  |  No Comments

High performance, right-sized, modular, hot-scalable, 3-phase power protection with ultra high availability and efficiency for any size data center or high density power zone.

The APC Symmetra PX is a world class, redundant, scalable, power protection system designed to cost effectively provide high levels of availability. Seamlessly integrating into today’s state-of-the-art data center designs, the Symmetra PX is a true modular system. Made up of dedicated and redundant modules–power, intelligence, battery and bypass, all engineered into a design that is easily and efficiently serviceable, this architecture can scale power and runtime as demand grows or as higher levels of availability are required. Symmetra PX serves as the core power train that drives APC InfraStruXure® systems for small and medium data centers but can also power individual “zones” of larger data centers. Highly manageable, the Symmetra PX features self-diagnostic capabilities and standardized modules which mitigate the risk of human error resulting in increased overall data center reliability.

Highlights the agility and scalability of the Symmetra PX: APC Symmetra PX: Agile Video.

To learn more about APC’s Symmetra line of products please contact Waite Ave at w.ave@apcdistributors.com or 1-888-486-7725, ext. 201.

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